Juan-Daniel Ramirez
University of Seville, Faculty of Psychology, Spain

E-mail:juandaniel@us.es

 

ALPHABETIC LITERACY AND INTERNAL DIALOGIUE:
CROSSROADS BETWEEN PSYCHOLOGY AND CULTURAL HISTORY

 

From Vygotsky's time to today several researchers have demonstrated the social and dialogical origin of inner speech and the existence of an intermediate step between social and inner speech, named initially by Jean Piaget egocentric speech, characterized by the lack of differentiation between speech-for-other and speech-for-myself (Vygotsky, 1934; Wertsch, 1985; Ramírez, 1992). In a very complementary way Bakhtin viewed inner speech or inner dialogue as the tool for the understanding of any kind of semiotic material, social discourses and, consequently, writing texts establishing a close relationship between inner speech and reading comprehension (Volshinov, 1986; Ramirez, Sanchez & Santamaria, 1996). The main goal of this presentation is to analyze the function of inner speech in reading in silent. However, this contradictory form of activity - that is silent and, at the same time, verbally mediated - represents the last step in the history of literacy as the result of combining Western alphabetization process and the serial production of texts thanks to the mobile type printing and its later development. For this reason, the development of silent reading must be studied from the culture-historical domain in the context of the sociogenetic approach proposed by Vygotsky (Chartier, 1995; Eisenstein, 1979; McLuhan, 1962; Saenger, 1996).