Raya Jones
Cardiff University, School of Social Sciences, UK

E-mail:jonesRA9@cardiff.ac.uk

 

METAPHOR AND MEANING IN TWO MODELS OF THE SELF

 

There are parallels between Hermans' dialogical selves model and Jung's model of the psyche, though a convergence of the two theoretical lines might be illusionary. This paper examines the different metaphors implicit in the respective models, and considers how these channel theorizing about meaning making processes. The dialogical model is anchored in the post-modern attribution of selfhood to communicative praxis. It views the self as multivoiced, structured chiefly in self-other evaluations that are taken from a changeable I-position. Jung similarly conceptualized the psyche as a divided whole, comprised of complexes across which the ego 'slides', but he assumed that the psyche is pre-configured, and attributed its archetypal structure to hominid evolution. Today, Jung's assumptions about evolution, and the universalist and essentialist premises of his psychology, could be queried. Yet his theory addresses a dimension of meaning making that is arguably understated in contemporary dialogical approaches.