HST 362: RUSSIA SINCE 1900

Prof. Judge

Office: RH 404

Hours: Tu 5-6, W 9:30-12, Th 3-4

Phone: 445-4472

web.lemoyne.edu/~judge

judge@lemoyne.edu

I. READINGS: The readings to be used in this course are listed below. They are available on reserve at the College Library and on sale at the College Bookstore.

Wren and Stults, The Course of Russian History (text)

Sheila Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution, 1917-1932

Arthur E. Adams, Stalin and His Times

Alexander Solzhenitsyn, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

John Langdon, Handbook for Historians

 

II. COURSE OUTLINE AND CLASS SCHEDULE

   A. BACKGROUND: HISTORICAL ROOTS OF MODERN RUSSIA (Aug 29)

   B. THE DECLINE AND FALL OF THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE (Sep 3-12)

      Readings: text, ch. 15 (311-328); Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution, ch. 1

   C. REVOLUTIONARY RUSSIA (Sep. 17-26)

      Readings: text, ch. 17; Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution, chs. 2-4

FIRST EXAM (OCTOBER 1)

   D. THE RISE OF STALIN AND GREAT TRANSFORMATION (Oct. 3-17)

      Readings: text, chs. 18-19; Adams, Stalin and His Times, chs. 1-3

   E. THE SOVIET UNION AS A WORLD POWER (Oct. 22-29)

      Readings: text, ch. 20; Adams, Stalin and His Times, chs. 4, 5

SECOND EXAM (OCTOBER 31)

   F. S0VIET S0CIALISM IN THE NUCLEAR AGE (Nov. 5-26) [PROJECTS DUE N0V. 26]

      Readings: text, ch. 21; Solzhenitsyn, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (entire)

   G. THE GORBACHEV REVOLUTION & POST-SOVIET RUSSIA (April 25-May 2)

      Readings: text, ch. 22,23

FINAL EXAM (WEDNESDAY, DEC 11, 3:00-5:30)

 

III. COURSE PROJECT: Each student is required to submit a course project. This will normally consist of a 1500-2000 word (7-10 page) RESEARCH PAPER or REVIEW ESSAY. Projects are due on Tuesday, November 26. They must be double-spaced, with 1-inch margins and normal-size letter-quality print. Students must submit 2 copies, one of which will be returned and one kept by the professor. Late projects will be discounted 5% for each class day they are late.

Students who do the RESEARCH PAPER may select any topic which fits their interests, as long as they clear it with the professor. Papers must include title page, thesis statement, outline, text, footnotes or endnotes (not parenthetical notes), and a bibliography of at least 7 sources, all in the format prescribed in chapters V, VI and VII of  the Handbook for Historians and exemplified in the sample paper at the end. You may use up to 2 internet sources, as long as they are either primary source historical documents or scholarly articles that provide their authors' names and document their sources. Websites that do not provide the author's name and documentation, as well as textbooks, class notes and encyclopedias (in print or on line) may be consulted for background information, but they should not be listed as sources. Grading will be based on research, organization, argumentation, documentation, grammar, spelling, punctuation, clarity, and style.

Students who do the REVIEW ESSAY must select and read TWO BOOKS on Russia since 1900 (see book lists at end of chapters in the text), then prepare an essay which must include:

You need not necessarily deal with each of these points in the order they are listed here, but you must cover all of the points in youreview essay. To facilitate comparison, you should choose books on the same general subject, or books which have a similar approach, theme or time frame, and you should inform the instructor of your choices before beginning work.Students must not choose two books written by the same author.

IV. WEB PAGE AND E-MAIL: Copies of the course syllabus, daily class outlines, and exam study questions will be available online on the course web page (web.lemoyne.edu/~judge). You are welcome and encouraged to contact me via e-mail (judge@lemoyne.edu) to ask questions or submit a topic, thesis or book for approval. As a general rule, however, I do not respond to student messages left on my VoiceMail.

V. ATTENDANCE AND GRADES: Students are expected to attend all classes. There are no "excused" absences; a student who misses class, whatever the reason, must make up the material covered. Attendance at exams is mandatory; make-up exams will be given in extreme cases, but they will typically be scheduled at 7:15 AM and will be more difficult than the regular exam. Final grades will be computed as follows:

Mid-term exams  25% each           93-99 = A       83-86 = B        73-76 = C

Course project    25%                   90-92 = A-      80-82 = B-      70-72 = C-

Final exam           25%                  87-89 = B+      77-79 = C+     60-69 = D

Attendance & participation may raise or lower the final grade several points.

NOTE:  If you have a disability that requires academic accommodations, please register with the Academic Support Center (1st floor, Library, 445-4118), and then provide me with the information.